Turkish Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation 2013 , Vol 59 , Num 4
Comparison of Urodynamic Findings and Prescribed Emptying Method in Paediatric and Adult Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Patients
Ebru Özcan 1 ,Murat Ersöz 2 ,Selami AKKUŞ 3
1 Ankara Fizik Tedavi ve Rehabilitasyon Eğitim ve Araştırma Hastanesi, Ankara, Türkiye
2 Ankara Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey
3 Yıldırım Beyazıt Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi, Fiziksel Tıp ve Rehabilitasyon Anabilim Dalı, Ankara, Türkiye
DOI : 10.4274/tftr.94758

Objective: To investigate urodynamic findings and prescribed bladder emptying method in paediatric spinal cord injury (SCI) patients and to compare with those in adult SCI patients.

 

Materials and Methods: The urodynamic findings and prescribed bladder emptying method were retrospectively analyzed in 36 paediatric and 46 adult SCI patients.

 

Results: The urodynamic findings in paediatric and adult SCI groups were as follows: detrusor hyperactivity: 30/36, 28/46 (p=0.027), detrusor hypocompliance: 14/36, 11/46 (p=0.144), absent sensation of bladder filling: 20/36, 14/46 (p=0.022), storage dysfunction: 32/36, 33/46 (p=0.057), and emptying dysfunction: 35/36, 45/46 (p=0.163). The frequency of the prescribed bladder emptying method in paediatric and adult SCI groups were spontaneous voiding-emptying without an urinary catheter in 5/36, 4/46, intermittent catheterization in 11/36, 32/46, indwelling urethral catheter in 20/36, 10/46, respectively (p=0.002).

 

Conclusion: There are significant differences in neurogenic bladder dysfunction between paediatric and adult SCI patients. Urodynamic evaluation and bladder rehabilitation in children with SCI should be carried out without delay and should not be overlooked. Close monitoring of prescribed catheterization volumes and follow-up of the possible complications of indwelling catheterization seems to be reasonable in paediatric SCI patients.

Keywords : Paediatric spinal cord injury, spinal cord injury, neurogenic bladder, urodynamics